Is Arduino have Good Future?

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10 Sep 2020 08:50 #181584 by ArjunKumar
Hello All, my young brother wants to build our career as a Arduino developer but I don't have enough knowledge about this programming language. Can anyone suggest me Arduino is a good career, If yes then suggest me some online courses where my brother takes a reference or start learning about arduino.

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10 Sep 2020 09:06 - 10 Sep 2020 09:15 #181587 by BeagleBrainz
No.

Become a toolmaker or plumber or electrician or carpenter or cabinet maker or boilermaker or a machine operator.

There will always be plumbing to install repair upgrade.
There will always be electrical systems to install repair upgrade.
There will always be houses buildings that need building repairing or renovating.
People need kitchens, places to put things and shops need fittings.
Metals need welding, can't bring a robot on site to weld in a corner upside down 70m in the air.
Humans will always need to move earth.
And for tool makers, they are just wizards.
Last edit: 10 Sep 2020 09:15 by BeagleBrainz.
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10 Sep 2020 23:52 - 10 Sep 2020 23:53 #181691 by Himarc3D
To my case Arduino was a entrance gate.
Using it i build up knowledge about sensors, lcd, bcd, motor, driver, mechanical, digital, analog etc for low cost.
Arduino is prototype plataform IMO.
You need to learn C/C++
Good start pount to learn C
online-learning.harvard.edu/course/cs50-...uter-science?delta=0
Here isnt the proper place to talk about it, you need to arduino forum at least.
How you come here? Do you use google?
Last edit: 10 Sep 2020 23:53 by Himarc3D.

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11 Sep 2020 00:06 - 11 Sep 2020 00:10 #181692 by BeagleBrainz
Too many "Arduino Experts" have little to no knowledge of electronics. For some people it seems to be the only tool in their toolbox.
I even read of a person using a arduino to fault find instead of a multimeter and being led up a garden path. Which I find really funny cos here in Oz a really cheap multimeter can cost less than a Arduino board.

And don't get me started on the amount of people who had trouble hooking up a power supply to a surplus SBC, marketed as the Atomic Pi, when there was very very clear instructions on the voltage & Amperage and when to connect the power.

The future of Arduino maybe good, but for those that use it as their only tool, it's a bleak future.
Last edit: 11 Sep 2020 00:10 by BeagleBrainz.

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11 Sep 2020 01:59 #181699 by thefabricator03

No.

Become a toolmaker or plumber or electrician or carpenter or cabinet maker or boilermaker or a machine operator.

There will always be plumbing to install repair upgrade.
There will always be electrical systems to install repair upgrade.
There will always be houses buildings that need building repairing or renovating.
People need kitchens, places to put things and shops need fittings.
Metals need welding, can't bring a robot on site to weld in a corner upside down 70m in the air.
Humans will always need to move earth.
And for tool makers, they are just wizards.


I agree with this post. Too many young people with brains do not consider trades to be viable. I my self am a boilermaker. People who have a bit of smarts about them can really excel in these areas and make a considerable amount of money if that is your goal. Also there is a lot of possibilities for combining new technologies with traditional trades like welding, plumbing, electrical and such.

People like to look down on the men that do the dirty jobs. Its funny because a lot of those men have large bank accounts compared to the white collar guys working in sales. Not always but for the smart ones yes. I know lots of builders, electricians, plumbers and boilermakers that own their own homes at a relatively young age.

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11 Sep 2020 02:15 #181703 by BeagleBrainz
In Sydney there was a big whinge from "office workers" once they found out how much Traffic Controllers were getting paid for "just standing on their", whilst they were putting in a Light Rail System.........As a TC I'd challenge one of those whiners to pull a 12 shift and keep a sharp mind and put up with the abuse, heat, cold & rain. Yeah and sometimes as much as you are supposed to get a 10 minute break every 2 hours, and that doesn't mean sitting down, you are on your feet for 4 to 6 hours at a stretch.
But some cultures see manual labour as a failure. I love it, rather be outside at different sites than stuck in the one office day in & day out.
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11 Sep 2020 02:46 #181711 by thefabricator03
I could not agree more. When I was on the tools full time I would work 6:00am to 5:00 pm with 20mins for smoko and half and hour lunch, five days a week.I was making really decent money and putting that back into my home loan. Im just over 30 and have a decent chuck of my mortgage paid for.

Not all tradie do the same. Some spend it on ski boats and such but I know more builders and plumber that have money to burn than white collar workers.

I went on to study engineering at Uni and racked up a bit of HECS debt but having a trade helped me pay it off much quicker.

And like you mentioned, people will always need skills that cant be outsourced. Kind of hard out source your leaking tap to China.
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11 Sep 2020 08:18 #181736 by tommylight
Arduino is something you learn in an afternoon, electronics is something you learn all your life and still end up not knowing everything.
As for trades, just have a look at Germany and how much it is investing in young people learning Manual mills and lathes, not cnc ones.

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11 Sep 2020 11:16 #181745 by Aciera
Replied by Aciera on topic Is Arduino have Good Future?
That is true tommy. I'm from Switzerland and, like Germany, we have a sound trade school and training system, 30 years ago I trained as an electronics technician in a local company that produces electricity meters. After four years, in our practical exam we were tested on operating a lathe, troubleshooting a circuit board all the way to writing assember code. Of course we did not always value that broadness of training at the time.:laugh: But I sure do appreciate it now.
Since then there has been a noticable decline in prestige for the trades and many companies find it hard to recruit suitable young people particularly those where you get your hands dirty and/or might work up a sweat.
Somehow we jumped on the bandwaggon of thinking that if you didn't go to university there must be something seriously wrong with you.
I know, sometimes we think that it was all better when we were young and that that is not always true. But where does that leave a society when the person fixing your toilet or your roof or cares for your granma in hospital is considered to be just to dim to have done better in life?
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11 Sep 2020 11:27 #181746 by tommylight
People who think their work is hard should really go spend a day in the emergency room just watching, what those doctors and technicians endure during a shift is mind boggling, those technicians have only middle school and a year of training but save lives on a daily basis same as those doctors.
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